Posts Tagged ‘Abraham Lincoln Library & Museum’

Just in time for Independence Day — The Declaration

Wednesday, July 4th, 2012

 

The United States Declaration of Independence

When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

 

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. –Such has been the patient sufferance of these colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former systems of government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these states. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his assent to laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

He has forbidden his governors to pass laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of representation in the legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise; the state remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these states; for that purpose obstructing the laws for naturalization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers.

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies without the consent of our legislature.

He has affected to render the military independent of and superior to civil power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation:

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment for any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these states:

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing taxes on us without our consent:

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of trial by jury:

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended offenses:

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary government, and enlarging its boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule in these colonies:

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable laws, and altering fundamentally the forms of our governments:

For suspending our own legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of his protection and waging war against us.

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation.

He has constrained our fellow citizens taken captive on the high seas to bear arms against their country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare, is undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms: our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace friends.

We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do. And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.

New Hampshire: Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton

Massachusetts: John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry

Rhode Island: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery

Connecticut: Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott

New York: William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris

New Jersey: Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark

Pennsylvania: Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross

Delaware: Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean

Maryland: Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton

Virginia: George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton

North Carolina: William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn

South Carolina: Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton

Georgia: Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton

Source: The Pennsylvania Packet, July 8, 1776


Fun breakfasts at the Market Street Inn

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

We had a house full all weekend and our guests really enjoyed the fare. Memorial Day breakfast consisted of Egg Strada with fresh dill from our garden, sausage patties, watermelon and buttermilk biscuits

 

 

 

 

 

This entree was followed by a “sweet ending” of St. Louis Gooey Butter Cake.

We had guests from all over Illinois, New York City and St. Louis


Here is a Unique Event!!

Saturday, October 22nd, 2011

The lovely and little known persimmon is the focus of a festival, known as the Persimmon Party, held annually on the grounds of the Christian County Historical Society in Taylorville, IL.  This is a unique event in that it is one of only 3 such festivals for the persimmon in the U.S.  Persimmons seemingly have diminished in importance and usage to the American public over the years and cultivation of the trees is not as prominent at it once was even though the tasty fruit has many important food and medicinal properties.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persimmon .

 

 

Every year, when the persimmons ripen, members of the Chrisitan County Historical Society http://www.taylorville.net/Historical_Society.htm gather and “pulp” the persimmons and package and freeze the pulp and have it waiting for the folks who attend the Persimmon Party to purchase and take home to use in delectable dishes for their table.  What a great addition to your Thanksgiving Dinner.  This year the Annual Persimmon Party will be November 12 and 13, 2011.  What a great time to come to Taylorville for fun , food and festivities.  There are always a variety of foods, made from the persimmon pulp, to sample maybe including Persimmon Drop Cookies and Persimmon Pudding as shown belowCookies and Persimmon Pudding as shown below.  The Christian County Historical Society has two Persimmon Cookbooks for sale to provide ideas about how to use the persimmon pulp you purchase during your visit.

                                                                                                     

The Christian County Historical Society grounds are comprised of a variety of buildings of historical value including a Bee Castle and the original Christian County Courthouse in which Abraham Lincoln practiced law on the Illinois 8th Judicial Circuit.  Please take the time to pay a visit to our Facebook Page and like us.  http://www.facebook.com/pages/Christian-County-Illinois-Historical-Society-and-Museum/137053123008672

Come to Christian County Illinois for fun, history and good times.  The county seat of Christian County is Taylorville, Illinois where you will find all sorts of restaurants, lodging and even more history.  We are located just 30 minutes from both Springfield and Decatur, Illinois.

 

 


Do you think a “Cemetery Walk” is spooky or fun?

Monday, September 12th, 2011

Every year for the last several the Christian County Geneology Society has sponsored a “Cemetery Walk” at Oak Hill Cemetery in Taylorville, IL.  This year the date is set for Sunday, September 25, 2011.  This is an event of historic note which will thrill those interested in heritage, history and our early beginnings.

Extensive research is conducted on persons of interest, historically, in Christian County and a local person protrays that person at graveside and tells their story of trials and tribulation, triumph and tragedy, failure and success including the family history which must accompany the story.  You will “meet” housewives, school teachers, store owners, bankers, lawyers, ministers, soldiers and statesmen and hear an accurate recapitulation of their life.  You will share their joys and tears and successes and failures and go away with more of an understanding of what life in the 1800′s and early 1900′s held in store for those here and living in a much simpler time than we live in today.

There is a modest fee to attend and truly enjoy learning about our ancestors and there is also transportation from site to site for those who need assistance.  Come in on Friday or Saturday and take some time to see the community today.  Enjoy the Farmers Market on Saturday morning on the National Registry Historic Square where Abraham Lincoln used to practice law.  Visit the Christian County Historical Society site on Friday or Saturday and make a weekend of it.  There are fun restaurants here with tasty, reasonably priced food.  Come and enjoy life at a slower pace.  Sit on our porch and sip and read.  We’ll look forward to seeing you.


Easter Parade (Promenade)

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Many years ago it was a tradition to Parade in one’s Easter finery along the Avenue and meet and greet and see and be seen by one and all.  Several inspired young ladies of fashion in Taylorville are recreating this tradition on Saturday, April 23 at 1:30 PM around the National Historic Registry Taylorville Square.  

Come and participate in our Easter Parade (Promenade_)

  Note!!!  This is not only for ladies of fashion but gentlemen as well.  Ladies, wear your Easter Bonnet and your finery and gentleman, wear your chapeau and fine suitings as well.  Don’t have a chapeau or a bonnet?  Go online and Google Easter Bonnet and Easter Parade and create your own.  What we want is participation.

The Taylorville Square is on the National Registry of Historic Places and has buildings dating back to the late 1800″s.  What a great place to meet and greet friends, both old and new.

Here are a couple of young ladies who have been hunting Easter Eggs in their beautiful attire.  Did I mention Easter Egg Hunt?  Yes, there will be an Easter Egg Hunt on the green of  the Courthouse Square sponsored by the Taylorville Kiwanis Club.  Eggs will contain various stuffings for the pleasure of the lucky who find them.  You might even expect a visit from the Easter Bunny.

Beginning at 1:30 PM is the Easter Promenade and remember, “This is not all about the girls!”  Men, come out and show your manhood by dressing up and parading with a finely dressed lady.  Or, perhaps, “Man’s Best Friend.”

 Of course, well behaved dogs are welcome, especially when attired in the finest of fashion.

After the Promenade, beginning at 2:30PM, there will be a wine tasting in the Shumway Room at One East Market Restaurant and Jazz Lounge.  Please come and enjoy.  Make a dinner reservation, go home and change and come back in your dancing  shoes to enjoy the sounds of The Big Shake Daddies.  You will be glad you did.

Easter is the Celebration of the Rebirth of Christ and what a great to do this.  Of course, folks from Miles Around and other well known cities are invited to join in and make this celebration the success it should be.  Happy Easter from the Market Street Inn Bed and Breakfast.


Family does Christmas in Central Illinois

Monday, December 6th, 2010

The Williams Family, who traveled from all over the US and from Spain and Scotland to spend an early Christmas with each other at

our Central Illinois Inn. What fun to have 23 fun folks gathering in our commons areas to reacquaint     with one another, tell stories of happenings since seeing each other last, telling the patriarch that he is going to be a grandfather once again and playing with and loving on the little children. Patriarch Williams will be 89 in January 2011 and is sharp and spry as is Matriarch Williams.

As innkeepers, we found it much fun to watch, listen and attempt to anticipate the wants and needs of the various members of all ages.  At breakfast on Saturday, one of the sisters-in-law gave one of our innkeepers a test on the names of everyone at the table.  He passed the test.  

Every Saturday morning, the Clock Keeper of our Courthouse Clock will take anyone who is waiting about 8 AM at the South Door of the Christian County Courthouse up into the clocktower while he winds the 7 Day Clock which faces the 4 points of the compass. The Clock Keeper is also very intimate with the engineering and architecture of the Christian County Courthouse and the changes which have been made in the past couple of years. He tells folks about the restoration of the art glass dome, the false ceiling which was removed to expose it once again to view from below and the removal of the second floor center to provide a view from the first floor all the way up.

Christian County Illinois Courthouse

Restored Art Glass Dome

The Clock Keeper also tells folks about the restored Tern and Bittern fountain on the Southwest Lawn and the 4 year old, bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln and the “pig story” on the Northwest Lawn. The entire Williams Family enjoyed the small town hospitality which happens here in Taylorville in Central Illinois.

Just about all of the Williams Family

 We hope you come back someday, Williams Family.


Central Illinois Persimmon Fest–One of only 2 or 3 in the US!

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Who thinks about Persimmons today? Probably not a lot of folks but the Persimmon Fest in Central Illinois at the Christian County Historical Museum sure does draw a crowd from all over the country and then some. Actually the persimmon is a sought after fruit in Asian Countries.

The Lovely and Versitile Persimmon

Persimmons are not ready to eat, at least by local standards, before they have undergone a “killing frost” and we have had one now so the persimmon harvest is coming in, they are being washed, pitted and mashed into a pulp for use in all sorts of tasty dishes including puddings, pies, steamed persimmon pudding, spiced persimmon cake and other baked goods.  Darleen Wilson is making 24 persimmon pecan pies for this event.  Abraham Lincoln would have loved Darleen’s pies.

Persimmon Bundt with Walnuts

Persimmon Bundt with Walnuts Recipe

These are a take from Food Librarian’s 30 Days of Big Bundts

Grease and flour a bundt cake pan. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Chop 3 cups of chopped firm Fuyu persimmons. Set aside.
Beat 1/2 cup vegetable margarine with 1/2 cup agave syrup. Add 2 tsp. lime juice, and 1 scraped vanilla bean. Whisk in Egg Replacer for 2 eggs.
Sift together 2 cups cake flour, 1 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. ground allspice, 1 tsp. cinnamon, and 2 tsp. nutmeg. Add wet ingredients and combine well.
Add 1 cup chopped walnuts and 2 tbsp candied chopped ginger. Mix well and
pour into pan. Bake 50- 60 minutes or until toothpick tests clean. Cool in pan 15 minutes. 6 mini bundts or a large bundt.
I added a lemon glaze to one but you don’t need it.

The Persimmon Fest at Christian County Historical Society will be on Saturday and Sunday, November 13 and 14 from 10 AM to 3 PM on both days.  There will be demonstrations and persimmon goodies for the tasting.  Persimmon Pulp to purchase for use in your favorite persimmon recipes will be available and, there will probably be a persimmon cook book for sale too.  Come and stay at our fine inn  and enjoy a rare festival in Central Illinois.  By the way, the original Christian County Courthouse where Abraham Lincoln practiced law will be open for touring at this site.


Fireplaces & Whirlpool Tubs for Two in Central Illinois

Friday, October 22nd, 2010
Spring Garden Room Fireplace

Romance and warmth multiply in flickering firelight

We are approaching the time of year when warmth is a desirable thing. There is nothing like a flickering fire or the warm bubbling waters of a whirlpool tub for two to warm and stimulate you and your partner and enhance relaxation and romance. Both fire flicker and bubbling jets of our whirlpool rooms are available at the Market Street Inn Bed and Breakfast www.marketstreeinn.com.

Carriage House Hunt Club Suite Bath

Whirlpool Tub for Two next to a Fireplace

Most of our guest rooms have either a gas log fireplace or an electric fireplace while our Hunt Club in the Carriage House has both. Enjoy the romance, the escape and each other.


Lincoln Bicentennial: The Last Lincoln Lecture

Monday, February 2nd, 2009

There will be a very interesting lecture on Lincoln at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum a week from today on Feb. 9 at 7 p.m.

Richard Carwardine

Richard Carwardine

If you are looking to learn and experience more about our 16th President while staying at our Springfield IL lodging, this lecture will be a great chance to gain an experts insight into Lincoln’s mind.

“The Last Lincoln Lecture” will be held by Oxford scholar Richard Carwardine. Carwardine is hoping to discuss the position of Lincoln within the global setting and examining what Lincoln believed the United States’ relationship was with the rest of the world.

He is the author of Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power. This is just one of the many oppurtunities to learn and explore Linconland during your stay at the Market Street Inn.


Lincoln Bicentennial: Local Lectures

Thursday, January 15th, 2009

Look forward to local Lincoln events soon near our Springfield IL lodging.


On February 8th and 9th at the Abraham Lincoln Library & Museum, enjoy a presentation by Columbia University historian Erik Foner, who has recently finished a book project as editor of esteemed essays on Lincoln. The book is called Our Lincoln: New Perspectives on Lincoln and His World. Foner will be presenting his thoughts on the 16th president during the lecture: “Reflecting on Lincoln”. The event will begin at noon in the library multi-purpose room.

Later in the day there is a panel discussion lead by the owner of the Abraham Lincoln bookshop Dan Weinberg. All the way from Chicago, he is going to be joined by some of the other leading Lincoln collectors in the nation. The panel, entitled “Collecting Lincoln”, will start at 2 p.m. This will be an excellent chance for visitors to learn more about Lincolnland. These events require reservations, so make sure to call the museum at: 217-558-8934


220 East Market Street | Taylorville, Illinois (IL) 62568 | (217) 824-7220 or (800) 500-1INN | Email: innkeeper@marketstreetinn.com